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20130228
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. and as has been noted, it may result in higher fares, fewer consumer choices, particularly in of and cities where to carriers over love. in retrospect, the effect of the mergers suggest that, in fact, fares did rise on some routes, where the two merger partners used to compete. given the size of the big three, legacy airlines that would remain after the merger, it's not entirely unreasonable to suggest that they would have even greater power to tacitly agree to raise prices. undermining price competition and harming consumers in the process. indeed, if american and u.s. airways were to merge, more than 70%, by some estimates as high as 86%, of the domestic airline industry would be controlled by just for airlines. i fear that the flying public will see relatively few benefits while bearing much of the cost of this potential merger. another related issue is whether the low-cost carriers can continue to provide effective, competitive pressure on what would be the big three legacy airlines, should this merger of her. .. against large legacy carriers. there's reason to wonder whether southwest
deputizing discrimination. this particular research study we did was for salt lake city, police chief burbank called us so bravely. he had built up in his house that was getting ready to pass, like most of us did, wanting to deputize his police officers and to make them immigration officers. and, of course, a lot of the language was pretty much you just don't stop anybody ask for their credentials and really say to you belong here. so most of us in law enforcement, we knew what that was going to do. you already don't trust us. let's do one more layer on top of that. so he had some grave concerns. and so what we did is one of the issues he had, all of his lawmakers were saying hey, if you do this, you will reduce crime because the association of crime and people of color was the only reason they're over here is to take our jobs, you're a member the arguments. when they bring their criminality into the system. so remember those conversations and to reflect back and say that sounds familiar, doesn't it? sounds very familiar. and the one of the things that he did was the cple went into the commit
and then travel to nuke city to run in a race in honor of a chicago police officer have been killed in the line of duty a year before. so on the evening of march -- may 19, thomas the tank our parents house when i left to show the pictures of police week activities. so he finished, they ate dinner and he went to lead. actually delete my father went with them to the door to walk met. i wasn't there obviously but according to reports this is what happened. two men approached thomas as he went to get on his motorcycle, pulled a gun on him and tried to take his motorcycle. now, thomas was a police officer so he was armed or told them he was a police officer. my dad, standing at the porch saw this happening to my dad was also armed. he had a gun and as. he went in the house to get the gun. he came back out. so there was an exchange of gunfire between the offenders, my brother and my father. when i got the call from my mother i had no idea how bad this wasn't. no idea. i just knew she was crying. she is a crier sometimes so i just knew i needed to get him. shortly after of the call traffic was stoppe
years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city, and he was of a nice guy, and we started talking about what i do for a living. and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for political office. why, he said, which stumped me because in my business, in my world the question of why we need more women is not a question. nobody asks why, they just ask how do we get more women there. and he went on to say, he said i have two daughters, i have a wyoming, i have a mother -- a wife, i have a mother, and what can women do in office that i can't do? which was an interesting question. and he had no idea what a can of worms he was of opening by -- [laughter] getting into this conversation with me. because i really believe that no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong as if you have men and women legislating together. and i'm happy to say that in the years since i started doing this work, the world has really come around very much to this idea. and the idea is that we need to add women to leadership not
like in the district with the college access program and city bridge, etc., there are certainly opportunities around yes which allows kids who graduate from certain cities to have their full college education paid for. again, what some on the panel have all said is how do we scale and replicate these to a far greater degree. in d.c. if you graduate from a high school, public or private, we essentially will subsidize, the taxpayers will, your going to any state college in the country and getting in-state rates. so lots of different strategies either to pay for school or to drive down costs, and i think probably lots more information needs to be disseminated but also leadership in your respective communities and what you can drive. taking some of those good examples whether it's city bridge or college access fund or the s.t.e.m. scholarship program in washington state, whatever, these are clearly doable with the right set of players and stakeholders coming together. >> yeah. that's absolutely right. we have time for, actually, one more question. so -- >> good morning. i am neil is
of raising 50 million sub-saharan africans out of poverty over the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. their grand parents ranches, farmers are having their own -- their own online dating service. and the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late paul harvey, was dodge rams heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. him what's that kenny chesney song? she thinks my tractor's sexy? you know, there's some truth to that. agricultural issues are, i would argue, sexy. if not sexy, increasingly critical and increasingly important. so i'm glad to be here and it's metaphorically appropriate that we are here today, because it turns out it was february 21, 1865, 148 years
economies and even more specifically city economies. and similarly, it strikes me ma that when we talk about manufacturing as a category, that's a little overbroad, because manufacturing is, in fact, 1,000, million little subcategories that add up to this bls o bea category of manufacturing. you broke down and said here's what specific cities are doing well and can have lessons for the american economy in the aggregate. what are some specific manufacturing sub sectors that are the cutting leading edge that the rest of this super subsector can learn from? >> top 100 metros in the united states, they sit on 12% of our landmass, they're two-thirds of our population, three-quarters of our gdp, and on every asset and indicator that matters they're at 75%, 80%, 85%, 90% of national share. so it's really hard to talk about an american economy. you have to talk about a network of met meth rho poll tan economies and same throughout the rest of the world. for a long time i think we focused a lot on the consumption economy. you know, and a walmart is a walmart is a walmart. you know, whether it's in ph
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7